Our use of cookies

We use necessary cookies to make our site work. We would also like to set some optional cookies. We won't set these optional cookies unless you enable them. Please choose whether this site may use optional cookies by selecting 'On' or 'Off' for each category below. Using this tool will set a cookie on your device to remember your preferences.

For more detailed information about the cookies we use, see our cookie notice cookie notice.

Necessary cookies

Necessary cookies enable core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility . You may disable these by changing your browser settings, but this may affect how the website functions.

Performance cookies

We'd like to set cookies to help us to improve our website by collecting and reporting information on how you use it. For more information on these cookies, please see our cookie notice. The cookies collect information in an anonymous form. Data is only used in aggregate.

Functionality cookies

We'd like to set cookies to provide you with a better customer experience. For more information on these cookies, please see our cookie notice.

Sharing your house or flat with a lodger?

A description of all the documentation that it is advisable for you to have in place when you rent a room to a lodger

If you own your house or flat and would like to rent out one of your rooms to a lodger, it is advisable to have an agreement in place to formally record the terms and conditions under which the lodger (referred to as the 'occupier') will share your property. Note that the lodger is not a tenant and only has a 'licence' to occupy as opposed to a tenancy. This distinction is important because lodgers have far fewer rights than tenants.

An 'Agreement for a landlord to share a house or flat' allows you to specify in writing details such as how much and when your lodger should pay you (known as a 'license fee'), which rooms they can access, if they need to contribute to the council tax bill and whether or not you will be providing any services such as cleaning. You can also use this agreement to require the occupier to supply a guarantee from a third party, such as a parent or relative. This is advisable if the lodger is young or a student. If you are taking on more than one lodger, you will need a separate agreement for each person.

This agreement creates a 'license' rather than a 'tenancy'. Unlike a tenancy agreement, which will give the tenant or occupier exclusive access to the property they are renting, a license agreement gives the owner the right to access their property at all times and use the facilities to the extent agreed. The agreement can be brought to end by the owner by giving the occupier notice in writing.

Our 'Agreement to share a house/flat' helps you set out the lodger's rights and responsibilities while ensuring that they don't acquire a tenancy.

Start your 'Agreement to share a house/flat' now

The information on this page applies to England and Wales only.

Copyright © 2019 Epoq Group Ltd. All trademarks acknowledged, all rights reserved

This website is operated by Epoq Legal Ltd, company number 3707955, whose registered office is at 2 Imperial Place, Maxwell Road, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire, WD6 1JN. Epoq Legal Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA number 645296).