Our use of cookies

We use necessary cookies to make our site work. We would also like to set some optional cookies. We won't set these optional cookies unless you enable them. Please choose whether this site may use optional cookies by selecting 'On' or 'Off' for each category below. Using this tool will set a cookie on your device to remember your preferences.

For more detailed information about the cookies we use, see our cookie notice cookie notice.

Necessary cookies

Necessary cookies enable core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility . You may disable these by changing your browser settings, but this may affect how the website functions.

Performance cookies

We'd like to set cookies to help us to improve our website by collecting and reporting information on how you use it. For more information on these cookies, please see our cookie notice. The cookies collect information in an anonymous form. Data is only used in aggregate.

Functionality cookies

We'd like to set cookies to provide you with a better customer experience. For more information on these cookies, please see our cookie notice.

Why should I make a Will?

Explanation of why it makes sense to write a will whether you are young or old, have lots of assets or few

Making a Will is important as it will ensure that when you die there are clear instructions about what should be done with all your assets (money, property and belongings, for example) and in particular how you want them to be distributed amongst your family and/or friends.

Start your Will now

In a Will you can also specify who should look after your affairs when you die. Known as an executor, this person (or persons) will make sure the instructions in your Will are carried out and the necessary legal processes, such as 'Probate', are undertaken. Additionally, if you have children you can nominate a 'guardian' to take care of them should you die before they have reached the age of eighteen.

If you don't have a Will when you die (known as 'dying intestate'), the State will decide what happens to your assets, regardless of your wishes or those of your family. This will often create anxiety and stress for those left behind and can result in disputes between family members. Having an up-to-date Will in place will help to minimise this.

Furthermore, it is possible to amend your Will at anytime, so if your circumstances change after you have written your Will, you can always amend it to reflect the changes.

The information on this page applies to England and Wales only.

Copyright © 2019 Epoq Group Ltd. All trademarks acknowledged, all rights reserved

This website is operated by Epoq Legal Ltd, company number 3707955, whose registered office is at 2 Imperial Place, Maxwell Road, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire, WD6 1JN. Epoq Legal Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA number 645296).